Monthly Archives: February 2013

Freeing Your Voice To Develop Voice Vibrato

develop voice vibratoTo truly free your voice and develop voice vibrato you must find the natural spin of vibrato. Vibrato is one of the vocal characteristics that is so often thought to be a gift or something that comes with age. But vibrato is merely just your voice free of any strain or stretch. There are exercises that help you find and develop your vibrato. Here are a few quick tips when it comes to starting to develop voice vibrato.

•If you have no vibrato on a sustained note, your voice is probably muscled up. “Muscled up” means, you are using other muscles not needed for singing.

•Singers with no vibrato on sustained pitches tend to sound off key, mostly sharp at times.

•You should feel no tighten under you chin when holding vibrato.

•Vibrato can be faked, but it usually involves stomach muscles or swallowing muscle not needed for singing, and this is not freeing your voice to it true potential! This kind of fake vibrato also sounds unpleasing and off pitch a lot to the listener.

•In the true spin of vibrato the pitch goes all around the centered pitch, but mostly heard above the pitch about a full step and back to the intended pitch in a spinning sound and sensation.

If you practice and visualize keeping your voice relaxed when you sing, and not pushing to reach high notes, your vibrato will come out naturally. The feeling you get when you sing with correct vibrato will be the beginning of the voice you have always dreamed of. Let it come naturally!

At True Connected Voice we are always available for one on one training and lessons, weather via Skype/Facetime or if you are in Tampa FL, Orlando FL, or any of the surrounding Central Florida areas contact us today and unlock the true potential of your singing voice.

Develop Voice Vibrato

Joe Genuardi

Joe Genuardi is a master vocal technician in Central Florida and performs voice lessons in and around Central Florida, Orlando, and the Tampa Bay area.

How To Practice Singing While Performing Live

how to practice singingHow to practice singing while performing is a fun way to develop your voice. As a full time musician, it’s hard to find the right time to practice my vocal exercises. I rely on my music career to keep my income coming. I can’t afford to take months off at a time and solely work on my singing voice. So for me, I practice my vocals during the day quite often, but at night even more so.

Every night before I take the stage, I run through my warm up, and throw a few new exercises in to try new things with my voice. I come across a lot of different songs that enable me to challenge specific areas in my vocal range. So I make note of these as they come up.

If I am about to sing a lower song, I will direct my focus to connecting in my chest voice, and making sure I have the correct power there that I need. Then I will back off the intensity. I don’t want to sound like I’m about to sing “Old Man River” fortissimo, when all I am singing is “Forever in Blue Jeans” mezzopiano. Of course this all starts before I walk in the door.

As soon as my feet hit the pavement I think about cleansing my lungs. As a former smoker who now walks .5 miles to work from the parking lot, I know that supercharging my blood and lungs with fresh oxygen is a good way to start the process of singing. It’s nice to just breathe and exist. Plus I like to cut my walk time down quite a bit each night. I look forward to staying in great fitness shape.

As I walk to work I slightly connect my voice. I rely on my speech to be the level where I start. But I will do some simple vocal fry exercises, humming, and lip rolls as I walk, maintaining a speech level output on my voice. So I’m not singing while walking. Just stretching the voice. Singing on the level of speech requires elasticity in the voice and body. I want to have a flexible voice, and a relaxed body when I sing. This produces the greatest output vocally.

If you notice in the picture above, I am keeping my head perfectly level as I sing Mark Cohn’s “Walking In Memphis.” I’m singing in mix in that photo. It was taken at my wedding. The eyes closed and expression was a selling point for my wife’s family who had never heard me sing. So I had to show off a bit.

As I sing different songs throughout the night I keep a close awareness on my vocal folds. What are they doing right now? Am I pulling up chest voice? Am I relaxed in my face, and is my head level? If not, I need to make a correction. I recently started lowering the keys to many of my songs for two reasons. One, to allow my chest voice to develop more, as that is the area of work I need the most. And two, it just sounds better. My voice isn’t falling apart after work, and I am warming down, and keeping a healthy voice. Healthier than I ever had before.

Applying some simple awareness to my voice, and even speaking some of my vocal exercises to my audience without them being aware of it has also made it possible for me to practice while I am performing. As we talk to our audiences every night, I sometimes slide up and down in pitch while speaking sentences. I even use the “hey” exercise when I greet guests. I simply speak the word “hey” a few times while sliding from low chest into mix. They think I just sound silly. But it’s a great way to evaluate how warm my voice is.

Develop a few little tricks you can apply to help create and elastic voice and reap the benefits of healthy singing! If you can learn how to practice singing while you are already performing you can improve your voice on the job.

How To Practice Singing

At True Connected Voice we are always available for one on one training and lessons, weather via Skype or if you are in Tampa FL, Orlando FL, or any of the surrounding Central Florida areas contact us today and unlock the true potential of your singing voice.

John Kenney is a musician in Central Florida and is training to become a certified vocal instructor.

Using Imagery To Improve Vocal Range

improve vocal range

Improve Vocal Range. So many times, when working with students in a lesson,  we are able to develop connection in their voice. But because these singers are so used to the feel of pushing and reaching for notes, it’s hard to get them to stop straining their voice and pushing chest voice into the vocal bridges. We like to create mental images to help our students visualize their voice and stop pushing and pulling their chest voice up or down. Creating the visualization of a relaxed voice in the correct position can help many singers remain relaxed and connect their voice through the bridges. We do this with three basic visualizations that you too can apply when singing to create a mix voice, and not cause strain or fatigue.

 

1. Keep Your Head Still. Some singers tend to lift their chin up as they gravitate toward higher notes. Instead of thinking you are singing up to a high note, imagine you are singing down to the high note. You can even think right and left, like a piano keyboard; high note to the right, low note to the left. Always remember your head should stay in the position of standing straight in a natural stance. Your chin going to your chest or chin up toward the ceiling is a bad habit!

 

2. Sing Through The Hole In The Back of Your Neck. Instead of pushing sound forward out your mouth, imagine a hole in the back of you neck and the sound is going out that hole to someone behind you are singing to. This imagery helps the singer keep the pharyngeal cavity open and relaxed to create a nice resonance.

 

3. Compress Air With Your Vocal Cords. Think of singing like your vocal cords are holding air back, rather than pushing air out. I love the lit candle mental image. Take any vowel sound and imagine a lit candle is in front of your mouth. You want to hold a comfortable pitch on a vowel, while not blowing the candle out.

Applying these visualization techniques when singing can greatly reduce vocal strain and fatigue while expanding range, and helping your vocal cords to become and stay connected.

Improve Vocal Range

At True Connected Voice we are always available for one on one training and lessons, weather via Skype/Facetime or if you are in Tampa FL, Orlando FL, or any of the surrounding Central Florida areas contact us today and unlock the true potential of your singing voice.

Joe Genuardi

Joe Genuardi is a master vocal technician in Central Florida and performs voice lessons in and around Central Florida, Orlando, and the Tampa Bay area.

Singing Connected After Mastering Vocal Exercises

Lip roll singing exercise
Lip roll singing exercise

So you mastered singing exercises with different vowel sounds. You’ve managed to perfect the lip or tongue rolls or one of the many other sounds we use to develop connection in your voice. Now all you can do is ask yourself “how do I sing songs with connected voice?” As many of our students begin to singing on the level of speech they realize that the exercises open their voices. Yet, when they sing, they still come disconnected. The challenge usually stems from having to sing as a part of their livelihood. Many of our students are professional singers that cannot afford to take time off to perfect their singing voice.

 

It takes an awareness in your own voice and a stubborn attitude to not slip back into old habits. This can take a lot of time to fully develop. The attitude and dedication, that is. The majority of the sounds you make in the vocal exercises is not much like the different sounds you re producing when singing lyrics. Vowel shapes need to be studied and learned. Adding consonants, and not relying on hard letters as a handle can cause frustration. Luckily, you are not alone in this challenge.

A great trick to start getting there in your singing, is to take a song you are working on and take all the words out and replace the words with the sounds of your exercises. Make note to how you produced the notes when the words are out of the picture. With difficult songs, I might take a few weeks of vocalizing the song without words and really get on touch with the feel of the melody in my vocal chords. Once you start putting words back in the song, switch back and forth from words and exercise sounds and get them to feel alike.

As you practice your singing, you may want to invest in a good notebook or notepad to write the sounds you are making on. Creating a visual reference that goes along with the muscle movement and audible sound can build a foundation for your lyric singing.

At True Connected Voice we are always available for one on one training and lessons, weather via Skype/Facetime or if you are in Tampa FL, Orlando FL, or any of the surrounding Central Florida areas contact us today and unlock the true potential of your singing voice.

Joe Genuardi

Joe Genuardi is a master vocal technician in Central Florida and performs voice lessons in and around Central Florida, Orlando, and the Tampa Bay area.